SEE Conference and Final Project Meeting in Madrid

24-26 September, 2014

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Join a social entrepreneurship course!

Dissemination Activity with “Vives Project”

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El pasado miércoles 29 de enero, el equipo de Vives Proyecto os convocó a los principales aliados y socios del mismo con el objetivo de mostrar los logros y resultados del proyecto en el año 2013 y mostrar las líneas y objetivos para el 2014.

 On January 29th, the team “Vives Project” called the allies and partners with the aim of showing the achievements and results of the entrepreneurship project in 2013 and show lines and goals for 2014. Transformando was there informing about the SEE project and the social entrepreneurship.

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Enter the network!

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Learn about social entrepreneurship

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Discover learning materials for social entrepreneurs

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Meet the Social Enterprising Europe programme

Social Enterprising Europe

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Test

Social Enterprising Europe (SEE) is a project aimed at integrating and improving the current offer of social business training by providing high quality training materials and a sound template program targeted to:

  1. Prospective social entrepreneurs
  2. Active social entrepreneurs
  3. Business trainers at academic and professional schools and in informal learning

Start-up coaches at start-up centres
Additionally, the project is committed to raising awareness about social business (what is it and why undertake it), among relevant target groups (people in employment and entrepreneurship support services, young unemployed, students in the last year of studies, NEET, etc.) and towards educators and policy makers.
- Social Business in Europe: page with a text (something like 20 lines) describing what is social business
The novelty of social business lies in the combination of productive economic activity and tackling social issues. Although the first social business labelled as that, the Grameen Bank founded by the Nobel Price laureate Yunus, was established in order to give micro-credits to the poor, experiences with social business in Europe tend to differ. In fact, Europe has a different social structure and different social challenges, including increasing unemployment, long-term interns and unsatisfied youth, etc. Therefore, this project will try to improve and better interpret the basic “fighting poverty idea” of the social business concept into a solid practice of “getting out of the crises and contributing to substantial and inclusive development in the European society simultaneously”.

Europe presents a favourable economic tissue, inasmuch SMEs represent the backbone of its economy. Such SMEs represent a great potential in times of crisis: they are a source of creativity and effort that, if properly directed, can help tackling critical social issues. For this reasons, and already since many years, European countries have invested in creating enterprise incubators, scientific parks and start-up centres. Most of them are associated with universities (trying to attract innovative business ideas, such as CPS and FPM), while others are connected to private companies or foundations (such as YES).

Most incubators focus on innovative or technology-based businesses, and offer training, consultancy and services in that domain. Very few, indeed, include social business training programs, which are left to more socially oriented initiatives, e.g., in the field of local development (such as the programs offered by TF and SEA). Only more recently, more attention has been paid to non-profit organizations and social businesses.
Social businesses work in the same way as traditional business, with three key differences, which make them a new type of organization:

  1. Connection with the social environment: social entrepreneurs need the ability to identify social issues and find business solutions. The central purpose of a social business is to create social profit – while the central purpose of a traditional business is to create financial profit. A social business tries to create positive social change using business methods. Understanding social issues is therefore a requirement.
  2. Measuring social impact. In a company’s success is measured more easily (completely economically), but in a social business it is complicated and it is essential to do well, to justify to funders or investors or customers. A starting point is the Social Return on Investment (SROI) model; or the Social Accounting and Audit, which has a much longer tradition of getting organisations with a social purpose to account for their performance and impact on people (social), the planet (environment) and on the local economy.
  3. Running the company as a non-profit-distributing business, i.e., managing the reinvestment of profits in an ethical manner, aligned with social goals.

NENEW

Social Enterprising Europe (SEE) is a project aimed at integrating and improving the current offer of social business training by providing high quality training materials and a sound template program targeted to:

  1. Prospective social entrepreneurs
  2. Active social entrepreneurs
  3. Business trainers at academic and professional schools and in informal learning

Start-up coaches at start-up centres
Additionally, the project is committed to raising awareness about social business (what is it and why undertake it), among relevant target groups (people in employment and entrepreneurship support services, young unemployed, students in the last year of studies, NEET, etc.) and towards educators and policy makers.
- Social Business in Europe: page with a text (something like 20 lines) describing what is social business
The novelty of social business lies in the combination of productive economic activity and tackling social issues. Although the first social business labelled as that, the Grameen Bank founded by the Nobel Price laureate Yunus, was established in order to give micro-credits to the poor, experiences with social business in Europe tend to differ. In fact, Europe has a different social structure and different social challenges, including increasing unemployment, long-term interns and unsatisfied youth, etc. Therefore, this project will try to improve and better interpret the basic “fighting poverty idea” of the social business concept into a solid practice of “getting out of the crises and contributing to substantial and inclusive development in the European society simultaneously”.

Europe presents a favourable economic tissue, inasmuch SMEs represent the backbone of its economy. Such SMEs represent a great potential in times of crisis: they are a source of creativity and effort that, if properly directed, can help tackling critical social issues. For this reasons, and already since many years, European countries have invested in creating enterprise incubators, scientific parks and start-up centres. Most of them are associated with universities (trying to attract innovative business ideas, such as CPS and FPM), while others are connected to private companies or foundations (such as YES).

Most incubators focus on innovative or technology-based businesses, and offer training, consultancy and services in that domain. Very few, indeed, include social business training programs, which are left to more socially oriented initiatives, e.g., in the field of local development (such as the programs offered by TF and SEA). Only more recently, more attention has been paid to non-profit organizations and social businesses.
Social businesses work in the same way as traditional business, with three key differences, which make them a new type of organization:

  1. Connection with the social environment: social entrepreneurs need the ability to identify social issues and find business solutions. The central purpose of a social business is to create social profit – while the central purpose of a traditional business is to create financial profit. A social business tries to create positive social change using business methods. Understanding social issues is therefore a requirement.
  2. Measuring social impact. In a company’s success is measured more easily (completely economically), but in a social business it is complicated and it is essential to do well, to justify to funders or investors or customers. A starting point is the Social Return on Investment (SROI) model; or the Social Accounting and Audit, which has a much longer tradition of getting organisations with a social purpose to account for their performance and impact on people (social), the planet (environment) and on the local economy.
  3. Running the company as a non-profit-distributing business, i.e., managing the reinvestment of profits in an ethical manner, aligned with social goals.